Rattling Stick advertising director Ringan Ledwidge dies at 50 – AdAge.com

Ledwidge was known for his meticulousness when it came to all aspects of craft. Such was on full display in acclaimed spots such as The Guardian’s “Three Little Pigs,” a modern-day take on the classic nursery tale created with BBH London, and Puma’s “After Hours Athlete,” via Droga5,…….

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Ledwidge was known for his meticulousness when it came to all aspects of craft. Such was on full display in acclaimed spots such as The Guardian’s “Three Little Pigs,” a modern-day take on the classic nursery tale created with BBH London, and Puma’s “After Hours Athlete,” via Droga5, which earned the Film Craft Grand Prix at Cannes. 

Davud Karbassioun, president of Pulse Films, had been a producer at BBH London on some of Ledwidge’s most memorable work, including the “Three Little Pigs” ad and spots for Levi’s, Lynx and Barnardos. Karbassioun considered Ledwidge his “hero” and dear friend. He noted that while the director was an obsessive craftsman and researcher, he “also had this very rare ability and enthusiasm to get everyone excited and on his side. Clients, agencies, crew, artists, talent all respected and trusted him and were willing to leap into his vision with him.”

Matt Hunnicutt, former head of production at Wieden+Kennedy, worked with Ledwidge on major spots for Nike such as “The Switch” and “Winner Stays.” He too saw in Ledwidge a pied piper who summoned those around him into his exhilarating creative world, all while celebrating the talent they brought to the party. 

“As a creative partner, Ringan always wanted you to feel the same infectious joy of loving something just as deeply as he did,” Hunnicutt said. “That energy for elevating and empowering people was his magic. It’s what made Ringan such a tremendous storyteller, partner and friend through the years for us. He was uniquely interested in each person and what moved them in order to realize a genuine emotion that would transcend.”

All, in the service of the message. “I choose what I do purely on the idea,” he told Ad Age in 2014, when discussing the ambitious, cinematic Sainsbury’s holiday centered on the World War I 1914 Christmas truce.

“There’s an effortlessness to his visual storytelling,” said Stuart Brown, a creative director at Apple and former Wieden+Kennedy creative who had worked with Ledwidge on Nike. “Like with the best writing you get so lost in the story that you don’t feel the author, in his work you get utterly lost in the stories and you don’t feel the director or any production choices.”

Ledwidge’s skills extended to music videos, for the likes of Massive Attack, as well as on features with the 2006 horror thriller “Gone.” But his cinematic mastery was most palpable in his legacy of ad world projects that entertained as much as they delivered for the client.

“He never did a director’s cut—he never needed to,” Karbassioun said. “He believed his responsibility was to get the very best expression of the work out to the real world and would fight for what he believed in every step of the way, always with the best intentions.”

In 2018, Ledwidge was awarded Director of the Year at Ad Age’s Creativity Awards, following an especially standout run of projects that included mesmerizing ads such as an end-of-days tale for Jose Cuervo from CPB L.A. and a completely out-of-the box move for Audi, via BBH London. Ad Age also deemed the latter, “Clowns,” as 2017’s best ad of the year, for its artfulness as well as its inspired approach to showing off the product. 

And though his ads worked hard to do their job, Ledwidge “made advertising that didn’t look or feel like advertising—it transcended it,” Karbassioun added. “So much …….

Source: https://adage.com/article/creativity/rattling-stick-advertising-director-ringan-ledwidge-dies-50/2379891

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