Brand safety drives need to measure digital advertising beyond the click – CMO

Basing digital media ROI on pure performance metrics is no longer cutting it for advertisers as brand safety and responsible marketing practices increasingly take centre stage.

That’s the view of GroupM APAC investment dire…….

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Basing digital media ROI on pure performance metrics is no longer cutting it for advertisers as brand safety and responsible marketing practices increasingly take centre stage.

That’s the view of GroupM APAC investment director, John Miskelly, who joined Twitter global head of brand safety strategy, Caitlin Rush, for a session yesterday held by the social media platform around ongoing efforts to improve brand safety for advertisers.

Speaking from his experiences of the early days of digital media buying, Miskelly said the genesis of an advertising approach was performance, or “dollar in, dollar out”.

“It was highly countable – though not necessarily accountable – and advertisers could measure what was deemed to be the ROI of performance of their campaigns. That’s not good enough anymore for advertisers,” he said. “It’s not only a case of performing well. Advertisers also want to make sure they’re investing responsibly, as well as rewarding publishing platforms trying to do the right thing.

“Everyone wants to crack measurement beyond clicks and acquisition.”

In response, GroupM globally has created a Responsible Investment media buying framework to try and tackle this issue.

“What we’re trying to do is go beyond performance and factor in other metrics to how we measure the quality of placements that prove platforms and publishers are doing right thing from an environmental, social and corporate governance perspective,” Miskelly said. “As we make sure we allocate dollars, we want to factor that in, rather than just the output of cost per acquisition or cost per click.”  

For Rush, heightened emphasis on brand safety from an advertising perspective also reflects growing consumer desire to support brands that are behaving responsibly from an environmental, societal and cultural point of view.

“It’s almost as if we’re seeing the same conscious consumption habits from the consumer side coming over into media investing and buying,” Rush said. “Brands and agencies are wanting to invest and buy from partners they know they have shared values with.”  

In this vein, it’s not enough for those providing the publishing, digital and social platforms advertisers use to just build tools that enable advertisers to avoid harmful content, Miskelly said.

“Clients are concerned their investments into social platforms, whether adjacent to harmful content or not, support their brand values,” he continued. “With things like GARM [Global Alliance for Responsible Media], we can at least point to progress and tangible transparency. From a platform perspective, clients want to make sure they’re doing as much as they have to get rid of these harmful factors off platforms all together, rather than just create tools to avoid it.”  

As Miskelly explained it, modern conceptions of brand safety are diverse, going beyond concepts of appearing next to harmful content or in “bad” environments. He described brand safety as a catch-all term for a wide array of financial risks for clients, from fraudulent activity to reputational risk, suitability, viewability, environments that brand ads appear in, legal risks around consumer privacy and more.

“It goes beyond where ads appear into a plethora of other elements of risk around digital advertising,” he said.

Brand safety concerns are also different across the Asia-Pacific region. For example in Australia, a highly developed market with more Web-based, journalistic content, clients show big focus on brand safety and suitability elements of digital advertising, Miskelly commented.

By contrast, in China, where it’s difficult to measure some of these things, …….

Source: https://www.cmo.com.au/article/693148/brand-safety-drives-desire-measure-digital-advertising-beyond-click/

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